Quantcast Silicon-controlled rectifiers (SCR) rectifiers (SCRs) for the control of power. Like other solid-state components, SCRs are subject to failure. You can test most SCRs with a standard ohmmeter, but you must understand just how the SCR functions. ">

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SILICON-CONTROLLED RECTIFIERS (SCR)

Many naval electronic equipments use silicon-controlled rectifiers (SCRs) for the control of power. Like other solid-state components, SCRs are subject to failure. You can test most SCRs with a standard ohmmeter, but you must understand just how the SCR functions.

As shown in figure 2-12, the SCR is a three-element, solid-state device in which the forward resistance can be controlled. The three active elements shown in the figure are the anode, cathode, and gate. Although they may differ in outward appearance, all SCRs operate in the same way. The SCR acts like a very high-resistance rectifier in both forward and reverse directions without requiring a gate signal. However, when the correct gate signal is applied, the SCR conducts only in the forward direction, the same as any conventional rectifier. To test an SCR, you connect an ohmmeter between the anode and cathode, as shown in figure 2-12. Start the test at R X 10,000 and reduce the value gradually. The SCR under test should show a very high resistance, regardless of the ohmmeter polarity. The anode, which is connected to the positive lead of the ohmmeter, must now be shorted to the gate. This will cause the SCR to conduct; as a result, a low-resistance reading will be indicated on the ohmmeter. Removing the anode-to-gate short will not stop the SCR from conducting; but removing either of the ohmmeter leads will cause the SCR to stop conducting - the resistance reading will then return to its previous high value. Some SCRs will not operate when you connect an ohmmeter. This is because the ohmmeter does not supply enough current. However, most of the SCRs in Navy equipment can be tested by the ohmmeter method. If an SCR is sensitive, the R X 1 scale may supply too much current to the device and damage it. Therefore, try testing it on the higher resistance scales.

Figure 2-12. - Testing an SCR with an ohmmeter.

Q.15 When testing an SCR with an ohmmeter, the SCR will conduct if what two elements are shorted together? answer.gif (214 bytes)

TRIAC

Triac is General Electric's trade name for a silicon, gate-controlled, full-wave, ac switch, as shown in figure 2-13. The device is designed to switch from a blocking state to a conducting state for either polarity of applied voltages and with either positive or negative gate triggering. Like a conventional SCR, the Triac is an excellent solid-state device for controlling current flow. You can make the Triac conduct by using the same method used for an SCR, but the Triac has the advantage of being able to conduct equally well in either the forward or reverse direction.

Figure 2-13. - Testing a Triac with an ohmmeter.

To test the Triac with an ohmmeter (R X 1 scale), you connect the ohmmeter's negative lead to anode 1 and the positive lead to anode 2, as shown in figure 2-13. The ohmmeter should indicate a very high resistance. Short the gate to anode 2; then remove it. The resistance reading. should drop to a low value and remain low until either of the ohmmeter leads is disconnected from the Triac. This completes the first test.

The second test involves reversing the ohmmeter leads between anodes 1 and 2 so that the positive lead is connected to anode 1 and the negative lead is connected to anode 2. Again, short the gate to anode 2; then remove it. The resistance reading should again drop to a low value and remain low until either of the ohmmeter leads is disconnected.

Q.16 When a Triac is properly gated, what is/are the direction(s) of current flow between anodes 1 and 2?answer.gif (214 bytes)




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