Quantcast electricity has its share of special shortcut methods. Some of the special circuit analysis techniques are: THEVENIN'S THEOREM, which uses a process of circuit reduction to Thevenin's equivalent circuit; and NORTON'S THEOREM, which is reduction of a circuit to Norton's equivalent. Another method is called LOOP ANALYSIS."> Equivalent circuit techniques

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EQUIVALENT CIRCUIT TECHNIQUES

The circuit solutions that you have studied up to this point have been obtained mainly through the use of formulas derived from Ohm's law. As in many other fields of science, electricity has its share of special shortcut methods. Some of the special circuit analysis techniques are: THEVENIN'S THEOREM, which uses a process of circuit reduction to Thevenin's equivalent circuit; and NORTON'S THEOREM, which is reduction of a circuit to Norton's equivalent. Another method is called LOOP ANALYSIS. This uses Kirchhoff's voltage law to simultaneously solve problems in parallel branches of a circuit. The use of these methods should be reserved until you have become thoroughly familiar with the methods covered thus far in this chapter. You may want to explore some of the special techniques later in your career.

ELECTRICAL SAFETY

Safety precautions must always be observed by persons working around electric circuits and equipment to avoid injury from electric shock. Detailed safety precautions are contained in NAVMAT P-5l00, Safety Precautions for Shore Activities and OPNAVINST 5l00-19, Navy Safety Precautions for Forces Afloat.

The danger of shock from a 450-volt ac electrical service system is well recognized by operating personnel. This is shown by the relatively low number of reports of serious shock received from this voltage, despite its widespread use. On the other hand, a number of fatalities have been reported due to contact with low-voltage circuits. Despite a fairly widespread, but totally unfounded, popular belief to the contrary, low-voltage circuits (115 volts and below) are very dangerous and can cause death when the resistance of the body is lowered. Fundamentally, current, rather than voltage, is the measure of shock intensity. The passage of even a very small current through a vital part of
the human body can cause DEATH. The voltage necessary to produce the fatal current is dependent upon the resistance of the body, contact conditions, the path through the body, etc. For example, when a 60-hertz alternating current, is passed through a human body from hand to hand or from hand to foot, and the current is gradually increased, it will cause the following effects: At about 1 milliampere (0.001 ampere), the shock can be felt; at about 10 milliamperes (0.01 ampere), the shock is of sufficient intensity to prevent voluntary control of the muscles; and at about 100 milliamperes (0.1 ampere) the shock is fatal if it lasts for 1 second or more. The above figures are the results of numerous investigations and are approximate because individuals differ in their resistance to electrical shock. It is most important to recognize that the resistance of the human body cannot be relied upon to prevent a fatal shock from 115 volts or less - FATALITIES FROM VOLTAGES AS LOW AS 30 VOLTS HAVE BEEN RECORDED. Tests have shown that body resistance under unfavorable conditions may be as low as 300 ohms, and possibly as low as 100 ohms from temple to temple if the skin is broken.



Conditions aboard ship add to the chance of receiving an electrical shock. Aboard ship the body is likely to be in contact with the metal structure of the ship and the body resistance may be low because of perspiration or damp clothing. Extra care and awareness of electrical hazards aboard ship are needed.

Short circuits can be caused by accidentally placing or dropping a metal tool, rule, flashlight case, or other conducting article across an energized line. The arc and fire which result, even on relatively low-voltage circuits, may cause extensive damage to equipment and serious injury to personnel.

Since ship service power distribution systems are designed to be ungrounded, many persons believe it is safe to touch one conductor, since no electrical current would flow. This is not true, since the distribution system is not totally isolated from the hull of the ship. If one conductor of an ungrounded electrical system is touched while the body is in contact with the hull of the ship or other metal equipment enclosure, a fatal electric current may pass through the body. ALL LIVE ELECTRIC CIRCUITS SHALL BE TREATED AS POTENTIAL HAZARDS AT ALL TIMES.




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