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DIGITAL TRANSMISSION

A digital signal is a discontinuous signal that changes from one state to another in discrete steps. A popular form of digital modulation is binary, or two level, digital modulation. In binary modulation the optical signal is switched from a low-power level (usually off) to a high-power level. There are a number of modulation techniques used in digital systems, but these will not be discussed here. For more information on digital modulation techniques, refer to the References listed in appendix 2.

Line coding is the process of arranging symbols that represent binary data in a particular pattern for transmission.

The most common types of line coding used in fiber optic communications include non-return-to-zero (NRZ), return-to-zero (RZ), and biphase, or Manchester.

Figure 8-6 illustrates NRZ, RZ, and biphase (Manchester) encoding.

Figure 8-6. - NRZ, RZ, and biphase (Manchester) encoding. 

NRZ code represents binary 1s and 0s by two different light levels that are constant during a bit duration. The presence of a high-light level in the bit duration represents a binary 1, while a low-light level represents a binary 0. NRZ codes make the most efficient use of system bandwidth. However, loss of timing may result if long strings of 1s and 0s are present causing a lack of level transitions. RZ coding uses only half the bit duration for data transmission.

In RZ encoding, a half period optical pulse present in the first half of the bit duration represents a binary 1. While an optical pulse is present in the first half of the bit duration, the light level returns to zero during the second half. A binary 0 is represented by the absence of an optical pulse during the entire bit duration. Because RZ coding uses only half the bit duration for data transmission, it requires twice the bandwidth of NRZ coding. Loss of timing can occur if long strings of 0s are present.

Biphase, or Manchester, encoding incorporates a transition into each bit period to maintain timing information. In Manchester encoding, a high-to-low light level transition occurring in the middle of the bit duration represents a binary 1. A low-to-high light level transition occurring in the middle of the bit duration represents a binary 0.

For further information on digital encoding schemes and modulation techniques, refer to the reference material listed in appendix 2.

Digital transmission offers an advantage with regard to the acceptable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the optical receiver. Digital communications systems can tolerate large amounts of signal loss and dispersion without impairing the ability of the receiver to distinguish a binary 1 from a binary 0. Digital signalling also reduces the effects that optical source nonlinearities and temperature have on system performance. Source nonlinearities and temperature variations can severely affect analog transmission. Digital transmission provides superior performance in most complex systems (such as LANs) and long-haul communications systems. In short-haul systems, the cost and complexity of analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion equipment, in some cases, outweigh the benefits of digital transmission.

Q.5 What is a digital signal?
Q.6 In NRZ code, does the presence of a high-light level in the bit duration represent a binary 1 or a binary 0?
Q.7 How can the loss of timing occur in NRZ line coding?
Q.8 How is a binary 1 encoded in RZ line coding?
Q.9 In Manchester encoding, does a low-to-high light level transition occurring in the middle of the bit duration represent a binary 1 or a binary 0?




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