Quantcast Relays solenoid is that a relay does not have a movable core (plunger) while the solenoid does. Where multipole relays are used, several circuits may be controlled at once. Relays are electrically operated control switches, and are classified according to their use as POWER RELAYS or CONTROL RELAYS. Power relays are called CONTACTORS; control relays are usually known simply as relays. ">

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RELAYS

The RELAY is a device that acts upon the same fundamental principle as the solenoid. The difference between a relay and a solenoid is that a relay does not have a movable core (plunger) while the solenoid does. Where multipole relays are used, several circuits may be controlled at once.

Relays are electrically operated control switches, and are classified according to their use as POWER RELAYS or CONTROL RELAYS. Power relays are called CONTACTORS; control relays are usually known simply as relays.

The function of a contactor is to use a relatively small amount of electrical power to control the switching of a large amount of power. The contactor permits you to control power at other locations in the equipment, and the heavy power cables need be run only through the power relay contacts.

Only lightweight control wires are connected from the control switches to the relay coil. Safety is also an important reason for using power relays, since high power circuits can be switched remotely without danger to the operator.

Control relays, as their name implies, are frequently used in the control of low power circuits or other relays, although they also have many other uses. In automatic relay circuits, a small electric signal may set off a chain reaction of successively acting relays, which then perform various functions.

In general, a relay consists of a magnetic core and its associated coil, contacts, springs, armature, and the mounting. Figure 3-19 illustrates the construction of a relay. When the coil is energized, the flow of current through the coil creates a strong magnetic field which pulls the armature downward to contact C1, completing the circuit from the common terminal to C1. At the same time, the circuit to contact C2, is opened.

Figure 3-19. - Relay construction.

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A relay can have many different types of contacts. The relay shown in figure 3-19 has contacts known as "break-make" contacts because they break one circuit and make another when the relay is energized. Figure 3-20 shows five different combinations of relay contacts and the names given to each.

Figure 3-20. - Contact combinations.

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A single relay can have several different types of contact combinations.

Figure 3-21 is the contact arrangement on a single relay that has four different contact combinations. (The letters next to the contacts are the "forms" shown in figure 3-20.)

Figure 3-21. - Relay contact arrangement.

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One type of relay with multiple sets of contacts is the clapper relay shown in figure 3-22. As the circuit is energized, the clapper is pulled to the magnetic coil. This physical movement of the armature of the clapper forces the pushrod and movable contacts upward. Any number of sets of contacts may be built onto the relay; thus, it is possible to control many different circuits at the same time. This type of relay can be a source of trouble because the motion of the clapper armature does not necessarily assure movement of all the movable contacts. Referring to figure 3-22, if the pushrod were broken, the clapper armature might push the lower movable contact upward but not move the upper movable contact.

Figure 3-22. - Clapper-type relay.

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Some equipment requires a "warm-up" period between the application of power and some other action. For example, vacuum tubes (covered later in this training series) require a delay between the application of filament power and high voltage. A time-delay relay will provide this required delay.

A thermal time-delay relay (fig. 3-23) is constructed to produce a delayed action when energized. Its operation depends on the thermal action of a bimetallic element similar to that used in a thermal circuit breaker.

A heater is mounted around or near the element. The movable contact is mounted on the element itself. As the heat causes the element to bend (because of the different thermal expansion rates), the contacts close.

Figure 3-23. - A thermal time-delay relay.

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Relays can be described by the method of packaging; open, semisealed, and sealed. Figure 3-24 shows several different relays and illustrates these three types of packaging.

Figure 3-24 (E), (G) and (H) are open relays.

The mechanical motion of the contacts can be observed and the relays are easily available for maintenance. Figure 3-24 (A), (B) and (C) are semisealed relays. The covers provide protection from dust, moisture, and other foreign material but can be removed for maintenance.

Figure 3-24. - Relay enclosures.

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The clear plastic or glass covers provide a means of observing the operation of the relay without removal of the cover. Figure 3-24 (D) and (F)are examples of a hermetically sealed relay. These relays are protected from temperature or humidity changes as well as dust and other foreign material. Since the covers cannot be removed, the relays are also considered to be tamper-proof. With metal or other opaque covers, the operation of the relay can be "felt" by placing your finger on the cover and activating the relay.

Q.24 What is the operating principle of a relay? answer.gif (214 bytes)
Q.25 How does a relay differ from a solenoid?
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Q.26 What are the two classifications of relays?
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