Quantcast Answers - Page 61q torque synchro is used for light loads and a control synchro is used in systems desired to move heavy loads. A5. The torque receiver (TR) and the torque differential receiver (TDR). A6. It is the third modification of a 26-volt 400-hertz (torque) synchro transmitter whose body diameter is between 1.01 and 1.10 inches. A7. The Navy prestandard designation code. ">

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ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS Q1. THROUGH Q76.

A1. The synchro.
A2. Precise and rapid transmission of data between equipment and stations.
A3. Torque and control.
A4. A torque synchro is used for light loads and a control synchro is used in systems desired to move heavy loads.
A5. The torque receiver (TR) and the torque differential receiver (TDR).
A6. It is the third modification of a 26-volt 400-hertz (torque) synchro transmitter whose body diameter is between 1.01 and 1.10 inches.
A7. The Navy prestandard designation code.
A8. The position of the arrow.
A9. The rotor and the stator.
A10. The drum or wound rotor.
A11. By the magnetic coupling from the rotor.
A12. At the terminal board.
A13. The number and type of synchro receivers, the mechanical loads on these receivers and the operating temperatures of both the transmitter and receivers.
A14. A measure of how much load a machine can turn.
A15. Ounce-inches.
A16. Aircraft.
A17. When it is overloaded.
A18. Synchros have one primary winding that can be turned through 360 and three secondary windings spaced 120 apart.
A19. The transmitter is in its zero-position when the rotor is aligned with the S2 stator winding.
A20. When the rotor coil is aligned with the stator coil.
A21. The amplitude of the primary voltage, the turns ratio, and the angular displacement between the rotor and the stator winding.
A22. A synchro receiver uses some form of damping to retard excessive oscillations or spinning.
A23. Mechanical damping.
A24. A synchro transmitter and a synchro receiver.
A25. The rotor leads.
A26. The voltages are equal and oppose each other.
A27. Signal.
A28. 1 and S3.


A29. The rotor leads on either the transmitter or the receiver are reversed.
A30. Differential synchros can handle more signals than regular synchros and also perform addition and subtraction functions.
A31. The TDX and the TDR.
A32. Their application: a TDX has one electrical and one mechanical input with an electrical output.
A33. The way the differential synchro is connected in a system is the deciding factor on whether the unit adds or subtracts its inputs.
A34. When the TDX rotor is on 0.
A35. 240.
A36. 80.
A37. The S1 and S3 leads are reversed between the TX and the TDX, and the R1 and R3 leads are reversed between the TDX rotor and the TR.
A38. The R1 and R3 leads between the TDR rotor and the TX to which it is connected.
A39. Clockwise.
A40. A control synchro.
A41. CX, CT, and CDX.
A42. The CX and CDX have higher impedance windings.
A43. The rotor is specially wound, it is never connected to an ac supply, and its output is always applied to a high-impedance load.
A44. They are perpendicular to each other.
A45. The voltage is maximum and in phase with the ac excitation voltage to the CX.
A46. Error signal.
A47. When the CX and CT rotors are in correspondence.
A48. To improve overall synchro system accuracy by reducing stator currents.
A49. TDXs, CDXs, and Cts.
A50. Magnetizing current.
A51. They are delta-connected across the stator windings.
A52. To keep the connections as short as possible in order to maintain system.
A53. A dual or double-speed synchro system.
A54. Greater accuracy without the loss of self-synchronous operation.
A55. The gear ratio between the two transmitters.
A56. A tri-speed synchro system.
A57. If one of the receivers goes bad the entire unit must be replaced.
A58. It is used in synchro systems to prevent false synchronizations.
A59. Electrical zero.
A60. The voltmeter method.
A61. It ensures the synchro is on 0, not 180.
A62. A TR is zeroed when electrical zero voltages exist across its stator windings at the same time its rotor is on zero or on its mechanical reference position.
A63. Approximately 37 volts.
A64. Never leave the circuit energized for more than 2 minutes.
A65. To ensure that it did not move off zero while it was being clamped.
A66. Zero or minimum voltage.
A67. The coarse synchro.
A68. The electrical lock method.
A69. It can be used only if the leads of the synchro are accessible and the rotor is free to turn.
A70. The synchro under test is not on electrical zero.
A71. Replace it.
A72. Improper wiring and misalignment.
A73. An overload indicator.
A74. The transmitter or main bus.
A75. 150 and 330
A76. Use only one receiver so as not to overload the tester.




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