Quantcast Simulated phase-shift keying. TIMING

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Figure 2-26A. - Simulated phase-shift keying. TIMING

Figure 2-26B. - Simulated phase-shift keying. DATA

Figure 2-26C. - Simulated phase-shift keying. DIGITAL MODULATION

Figure 2-26D. - Simulated phase-shift keying. DIGITAL MODULATION AFTER FILTERING

PULSE MODULATION

Another type of modulation is PULSE MODULATION. Pulse modulation has many uses, including telegraphy, radar, telemetry, and multiplexing. Far too many applications of pulse modulation exist to elaborate on any one of them, but in this section we will cover the basic principles of pulse modulation.

CHARACTERISTICS

Amplitude modulating a simple rf carrier to a point where it becomes drastically overmodulated could produce a waveform similar to that required in pulse modulation. A modulating signal [view (A) of figure 2-27] that is much larger than the carrier results in the modulation envelope shown in view (B). The modulation envelope would be the same if the modulating wave shape were not sinusoidal; that is, like the one shown in view (C).

Figure 2-27A. - Overmodulation of a carrier. MODULATING WAVE

Figure 2-27B. - Overmodulation of a carrier. MODULATION ENVELOPE

Figure 2-27C. - Overmodulation of a carrier. NONSINUSOIDAL MODULATING WAVE

Observe the modulating square wave in figure 2-28. Remember that it contains an infinite number of odd harmonics in addition to its fundamental frequency. Assume that a carrier has a frequency of I megahertz. The fundamental frequency of the modulating square wave is 1 kilohertz. When these signals heterodyne, two new frequencies will be produced: a sum frequency of 1.001 megahertz and a difference frequency of 0.999 megahertz. The fundamental frequency heterodynes with the carrier. This is also true of all harmonics contained in the square wave. Side frequencies associated with those harmonics will be produced as a result of this process. For example, the third harmonic of the square wave heterodynes with the carrier and produces sideband frequencies at 1.003 and 0.997 megahertz. Another set will be produced by the fifth, seventh, ninth, eleventh, thirteenth, fifteenth, seventeenth, and nineteenth harmonics of the square wave, and so on to infinity.

Figure 2-28. - Spectrum distribution when modulating with a square wave.

Look at figure 2-28 and observe the relative amplitudes of the sidebands as they relate to the amplitudes of the harmonics contained in the square wave. Note that the first set of sidebands is directly related to the amplitude of the square wave. The second set of sidebands is related to the third harmonic content of the square wave and is 1/3 the amplitude of the first set. The third set is related to the amplitude of the first set of sidebands and is 115 the amplitude of the first set. This relationship will apply to each additional set of sidebands.

View (A) of figure 2-29 shows the carrier modulated with a square wave. In view (B) the modulating square wave is increased in amplitude; note that the rf peaks increase in amplitude during the positive alternation of the square wave and decrease during the negative half of the square wave. In view (C) the amplitude of the square wave is further increased and the amplitude of the rf wave is almost 0 during the negative alternation of the square wave.

Figure 2-29A. - Various square-wave modulation levels with frequency-spectrum carrier and sidebands.

Figure 2-29B. - Various square-wave modulation levels with frequency-spectrum carrier and sidebands.

Figure 2-29C. - Various square-wave modulation levels with frequency-spectrum carrier and sidebands.

Figure 2-29D. - Various square-wave modulation levels with frequency-spectrum carrier and sidebands.

Note the frequency spectrum associated with each of these conditions. The carrier amplitude remains constant, but the sidebands increase in amplitude in accordance with the amplitude of the modulating square wave.

So far in pulse modulation, the same general rules apply as in AM. In view (C) the amplitude of the square wave of voltage is equal to the peak voltage of the unmodulated carrier wave. This is 100-percent modulation, just as in conventional AM. Note in the frequency spectrum that the sideband distribution is also the same as in AM. Keep in mind that the total sideband power is 1/2 of the total power when the modulator signal is a square wave. This is in contrast to 1/3 the total power with sine-wave modulation.

Now refer to view (D). The increase of the square-wave modulating voltage is greater in amplitude than the unmodulated carrier. Notice that the sideband distribution does not change; but, as the sidebands take on more of the transmitted power, so will the carrier.




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