Quantcast Wire Sizes wire sizes, refer to the proper publications for specific aircraft. Only AWG wire sizes are used in the following discussion.">

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WIRE SIZES

The most common method for measuring wire size in the Navy is by using the American Wire Gauge (AWG). An exception is aircraft wiring, which varies slightly in size and flexibility from AWG standards. For information concerning aircraft wire sizes, refer to the proper publications for specific aircraft. Only AWG wire sizes are used in the following discussion. Wire is manufactured in sizes numbered according to the AWG tables. The various wires (solid or stranded) and the material they are made from (copper, aluminum, and so forth) are published by the National Bureau of Standards.

An AWG table for copper wire is shown at table 1-2.

The wire diameters become smaller as the gauge numbers become larger. Numbers are rounded off for convenience but are accurate for practical application. The largest wire size shown in the table is 0000 (read "4 naught"), and the smallest is number 40. Larger and smaller sizes are manufactured, but are not commonly used by the Navy. AWG tables show the diameter in mils, circular mil area, and area in square inches of AWG wire sizes. They also show the resistance (ohms) per thousand feet and per mile of wire sizes at specific temperatures. The last column shows the weight of the wire per thousand feet. An example of the use of table 1-2 is as follows.

Table 1-2. - Standard Solid Copper (American Wire Gauge)

Gage number Diameter (mils)

Cross Section

Ohms per 1,000 ft

Ohms per mile 25C. (= 77F.) Pounds per 1,000 ft.
Circular mils Square inches 25C. (= 77F.) 65C. (= 149F.)
0000 460.0 212,000.0 0.166 0.0500 0.0577 0.264 641.0
000 410.0 168,000.0 .132 .0630 .0727 .333 508.0
00 365.0 133,000.0 .105 .0795 .0917 .420 403.0
0 325.0 106,000.0 .0829 .100 .116 .528 319.0
1 289.0 83,700.0 .0657 .126 .146 .665 253.0
2 258.0 66,400.0 .0521 .159 .184 .839 201.0
3 229.0 52,600.0 .0413 .201 .232 1.061 159.0
4 204.0 41,700.0 .0328 .253 .292 1.335 126.0
5 182.0 33,100.0 .0260 .319 .369 1.685 100.0
6 162.0 26,300.0 .0206 .403 .465 2.13 79.5
7 144.0 20,800.0 .0164 .508 .586 2.68 63.0
8 128.0 16,500.0 .0130 .641 .739 3.38 50.0
9 114.0 13,100.0 .0103 .808 .932 4.27 39.6
10 102.0 10,400.0 .00815 1.02 1.18 5.38 31.4
11 91.0 8,230.0 .00647 1.28 1.48 6.75 24.9
12 81.0 6,530.0 .00513 1.62 1.87 8.55 19.8
13 72.0 5,180.0 .00407 2.04 2.36 10.77 15.7
14 64.0 4,110.0 .00323 2.58 2.97 13.62 12.4
15 57.0 3,260.0 .00256 3.25 3.75 17.16 9.86
16 51.0 2,580.0 .00203 4.09 4.73 21.6 7.82
17 45.0 2,050.0 .00161 5.16 5.96 27.2 6.20
18 40.0 1,620.0 .00128 6.51 7.51 34.4 4.92
19 36.0 1,290.0 .00101 8.21 9.48 43.3 3.90
20 32.0 1,020.0 .000802 10.4 11.9 54.9 3.09
21 28.5 810.0 .000636 13.1 15.1 69.1 2.45
22 25.3 642.0 .000505 16.5 19.0 87.1 1.94
23 22.6 509.0 .000400 20.8 24.0 109.8 1.54
24 20.1 404.0 .000317 26.2 30.2 138.3 1.22
25 17.9 320.0 .000252 33.0 38.1 174.1 0.970
26 15.9 254.0 .000200 41.6 48.0 220.0 0.769
27 14.2 202.0 .000158 52.5 60.6 277.0 0.610
28 12.6 160.0 .000126 66.2 76.4 350.0 0.484
29 11.3 127.0 .0000995 83.4 96 440.0 0.384
30 10.0 101.0 .0000789 105.0 121.0 554.0 0.304
31 8.9 79.7 .0000626 133.0 153.0 702.0 0.241
32 8.0 63.2 .0000496 167.0 193.0 882.0 0.191
33 7.1 50.1 .0000394 211.0 243.0 1,114.0 0.152
34 6.3 39.8 .0000312 266.0 307.0 1,404.0 0.120
35 5.6 31.5 .0000248 335.0 387.0 1,769.0 0.0954
36 5.0 25.0 .0000196 423.0 488.0 2,230.0 0.0757
37 4.5 19.8 .0000156 533.0 616.0 2,810.0 0.0600
38 4.0 15.7 .0000123 673.0 776.0 3,550.0 0.0476
39 3.5 12.5 .0000098 848.0 979.0 4,480.0 0.0377
40 3.1 9.9 .0000078 1,070.0 1,230.0 5,650.0 0.0299

Problem: You are required to run 2,000 feet of AWG 20 solid copper wire for a new piece of equipment. The temperature where the wire is to be run is 25C (77F). How much resistance will the wire offer to current flow?

Solution: Under the gauge number column, find size AWG 20. Now read across the columns until you reach the "ohms per 1,000 feet for 25C (77F)" column. You will find that the wire will offer 10.4 ohms of resistance to current flow. Since we are using 2,000 feet of wire, multiply by 2. 10.4 ohms X 2 = 20.8 ohms

An American Standard Wire Gauge (figure 1-4)

is used to measure wires ranging in size from number 0 to number 36. To use this gauge, insert the wire to be measured into the smallest slot that will just accommodate the bare wire. The gauge number on that slot indicates the wire size. The front part of the slot has parallel sides, and this is where the wire measurement is taken. It should not be confused with the larger semicircular opening at the rear of the slot. The rear opening simply permits the free movement of the wire all the way through the slot.

Figure 1-4. - Wire gauge.

32NE0315.GIF (21666 bytes)

Q.9 Using table 1-2, determine the resistance of 1,500 feet of AWG 20 wire at 25C. answer.gif (214 bytes)
Q.10 When using an American Standard Wire Gauge to determine the size of a wire, where should you place the wire in the gauge to get the correct measurement?answer.gif (214 bytes)




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