Quantcast Frontal analysis

Order this information in Print

Order this information on CD-ROM

Download in PDF Format

     

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Frontal analysis
Back | Up | Next

tpub.com Updates

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books
   

 

Back ] Home ] Up ] Next ]

Click here to Order your Radar Equipment Online

FRONTAL ANALYSIS 

The thermal gradient is by far the most impor-tant guide in locating fronts. The 850- and 700-mb isotherm analyses are used as aids in determining the location, strength, and vertical extent of fronts. Isotherms generally parallel fronts, with the tightest packing (gradient) in the cold air (fig. 8-1-9). On upper-level charts that do not show fronts, isotherms are continuous lines. On those showing fronts, the isotherms may be discontinuous.

The thermal gradient and pattern in relation to fronts give an indication of a front’s strength. The weaker the gradient (in the cold air), the weaker the front and the greater the probability that the front has a shallow slope. The tighter the gradient, the stronger the front.

Isotherms may parallel cold fronts for long distances; however, somewhere to the north the isotherms may cross these fronts. Any appreciable crossing of these fronts by the isotherms indicates the front is occluded. Secondary cold fronts may also show an isotherm pattern that is more or less


Figure 8-1-9.—Isotherm packing at a warm and cold front aloft.

perpendicular to them. This indicates little air-mass contrast and a weaker front.

Back ] Home ] Up ] Next ]

 

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.