Quantcast
Safety Precautions With Batteries

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
 

Safety Precautions With Batteries

All types of batteries should be handled with care:

1. NEVER SHORT THE TERMINALS OF A BATTERY.
2. CARRYING STRAPS SHOULD BE USED WHEN TRANSPORTING BATTERIES.
3. PROTECTIVE CLOTHING, SUCH AS RUBBER APRON, RUBBER GLOVES, AND A FACE SHIELD SHOULD BE WORN WHEN WORKING WITH BATTERIES.
4. NO SMOKING, ELECTRIC SPARKS, OR OPEN FLAMES SHOULD BE PERMITTED NEAR CHARGING BATTERIES.
5. CARE SHOULD BE TAKEN TO PREVENT SPILLING OF THE ELECTROLYTE.

    In the event electrolyte is splashed or spilled on a surface, such as the floor or table, it should be diluted with large quantities of water and cleaned up immediately.

    If the electrolyte is spilled or splashed on the skin or eyes, IMMEDIATELY flush the skin or eyes with large quantities of fresh water for a minimum of 15 minutes. If the electrolyte is in the eyes, be sure the upper and lower eyelids are pulled out sufficiently to allow the fresh water to flush under the eyelids. The medical department should be notified as soon as possible and informed of the type of electrolyte and the location of the accident.


CAPACITY AND RATING OF BATTERIES

    The CAPACITY of a battery is measured in ampere-hours. The ampere-hour capacity is equal to the product of the current in amperes and the time in hours during which the battery will supply this current. The ampere-hour capacity varies inversely with the discharge current. For example, a 400 ampere-hour battery will deliver 400 amperes for 1 hour or 100 amperes for 4 hours.

    Storage batteries are RATED according to their rate of discharge and ampere-hour capacity. Most batteries are rated according to a 20-hour rate of discharge. That is, if a fully charged battery is completely discharged during a 20-hour period, it is discharged at the 20-hour rate. Thus, if a battery can deliver 20 amperes continuously for 20 hours, the battery has a rating of 20 amperes x 20 hours, or 400 ampere-hours. Therefore, the 20-hour rating is equal to the average current that a battery is capable of supplying without interruption for an interval of 20 hours. (Note: Aircraft batteries are rated according to a 1-hour rate of discharge.)

    All standard batteries deliver 100 percent of their available capacity if discharged in 20 hours or more, but they will deliver less than their available capacity if discharged at a faster rate. The faster they discharge, the less ampere-hour capacity they have.

    The low-voltage limit, as specified by the manufacturer, is the limit beyond which very little useful energy can be obtained from a battery. This low-voltage limit is normally a test used in battery shops to determine the condition of a battery.

Q31.When should safety precautions pertaining to batteries be observed? 34.Reduce the charging rate.
Q32.How long should a 200 ampere-hour battery be able to deliver 5 amperes? 34.Reduce the charging rate.


BATTERY CHARGING

    It should be remembered that adding the active ingredient to the electrolyte of a discharged battery does not recharge the battery. Adding the active ingredient only increases the specific gravity of the electrolyte and does not convert the plates back to active material, and so does not bring the battery back to a charged condition. A charging current must be passed through the battery to recharge it.

    Batteries are usually charged in battery shops. Each shop will have specific charging procedures for the types of batteries to be charged. The following discussion will introduce you to the types of battery charges.

    The following types of charges may be given to a storage battery, depending upon the condition of the battery:

1. Initial charge
2. Normal charge
3. Equalizing charge
4. Floating charge
5. Fast charge


Initial Charge

    When a new battery is shipped dry, the plates are in an uncharged condition. After the electrolyte has been added, it is necessary to charge the battery. This is accomplished by giving the battery a long low-rate initial charge. The charge is given in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions, which are shipped with each battery. If the manufacturer's instructions are not available, reference should be made to the detailed instructions for charging batteries found in current Navy directives.


Normal Charge

    A normal charge is a routine charge that is given in accordance with the nameplate data during the ordinary cycle of operation to restore the battery to its charged condition.


Equalizing Charge

    An equalizing charge is a special extended normal charge that is given periodically to batteries as part of a maintenance routine. It ensures that all the sulfate is driven from the plates and that all the cells are restored to a maximum specific gravity. The equalizing charge is continued until the specific gravity of all cells, corrected for temperature, shows no change for a 4-hour period.


Floating Charge

    In a floating charge, the charging rate is determined by the battery voltage rather than by a definite current value. The floating charge is used to keep a battery at full charge while the battery is idle or in light duty. It is sometimes referred to as a trickle charge and is accomplished with low current.


Fast Charge

    A fast charge is used when a battery must be recharged in the shortest possible time. The charge starts at a much higher rate than is normally used for charging. It should be used only in an emergency, as this type charge may be harmful to the battery.


Charging Rate

    Normally, the charging rate of Navy storage batteries is given on the battery nameplate. If the available charging equipment does not have the desired charging rates, the nearest available rates should be used. However, the rate should never be so high that violent gassing (explained later in this text) occurs.


Charging Time

    The charge must be continued until the battery is fully charged. Frequent readings of specific gravity should be taken during the charge and compared with the reading taken before the battery was placed on charge.


Gassing

    When a battery is being charged, a portion of the energy breaks down the water in the electrolyte. Hydrogen is released at the negative plates and oxygen at the positive plates. These gases bubble up through the electrolyte and collect in the air space at the top of the cell. If violent gassing occurs when the battery is first placed on charge, the charging rate is too high. If the rate is not too high, steady gassing develops as the charging proceeds, indicating that the battery is nearing a fully charged condition.

WARNING

    A mixture of hydrogen and air can be dangerously explosive. No smoking, electric sparks, or open flames should be permitted near charging batteries.

Q33.Can a battery be recharged by adding more electrolyte? 34.Reduce the charging rate.
Q34.If violent gassing occurs during a battery charge, what action should be taken? 34.Reduce the charging rate.




Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +